McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education: Facts of the Case

McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education: The Court’s Ruling

McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (1950), like Sweatt v. Painter (1950), is a landmark case in civil rights law that demonstrated that because the “separate but equal” doctrine was eroding, it was not possible to provide a separate but equal education in graduate and professional schools as well as in K–12 education.

Aaron Cooley

See also Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka: Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka and Equal Educational Opportunities; Civil Rights Movement; Fourteenth Amendment; Plessy v. Ferguson; Segregation, De Jure; Sweatt v. Painter

Further Readings

  • Klarman, J. (2004). From Jim Crow to civil rights: The Supreme Court and the struggle for racial equality. New York: Oxford University Press. 
  • Tushnet, M. (2005). The NAACP’s legal strategy against segregated education, 1925–1950. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press. 

Legal Citations